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Tim Jeal on the Explorers of the Nile

Tim Jeal on The Explorers of the Nile from FaberBooks on Vimeo.

Continue Reading · 12 October 2011 · history and politics, podcasts, video

Roger Luckhurst on Dracula

Roger Luckhurst of Birkbeck talks to me about the enduring appeal of Dracula and I ask him: “It’s all about sex, isn’t it?”

Continue Reading · 22 September 2011 · literature, video

Is that a fish in your ear?

Last week I interviewed David Bellos about his new book on translation, Is That a Fish in Your Ear? (Penguin Books) and he drew my attention to this wonderfully creative and witty animation produced by Matt Young and Alan Trotter. David explained that the film was unscripted; the filmmakers simply chose a section of their […]

Continue Reading · 11 September 2011 · language, video

One-Minute Word Histories: No.3 – Skulduggery

In the third of this short series of films, historical lexicographer Elizabeth Knowles talks about the history of the word ‘skulduggery’ and suggests a reason for its enduring appeal. There are more tips on how to pursue word histories for yourself in her new book, How to Read a Word (Oxford University Press, 2010).

Continue Reading · 6 January 2011 · language, video

Daljit Nagra on the ‘whoosh’ of poetry

An Interview with Daljit Nagra from FaberBooks on Vimeo.

Continue Reading · 5 January 2011 · poetry, video

One-Minute Word Histories: No.1 – Avatar

In the first of this short series of one-minute word histories, historical lexicographer Elizabeth Knowles explores the origins of the word “avatar”. If this inspires you, Elizabeth’s new book, How to Read a Word (2010), contains lots of tips on how to pursue word histories for yourself.

Continue Reading · 4 January 2011 · film, language, video

Robert Douglas-Fairhurst on Henry Mayhew

Robert Douglas-Fairhurst introduces a Victorian classic, Henry Mayhew’s London Labour and the London Poor, a work of journalism he has called “the greatest Victorian novel never written”. Interviewed in his rooms at Magdalen College, Oxford, he explains why this book is still well worth reading today.

Continue Reading · 23 September 2010 · history and politics, literature, video

Francis Spufford on Red Plenty

A short interview in which Francis Spufford, author of The Child that Books Built and Backroom Boys, discusses his latest book, Red Plenty: “Strange as it may seem, the grey, oppressive USSR was founded on a fairytale. It was built on the 20th-century magic called ‘the planned economy’, which was going to gush forth an […]

Continue Reading · 19 September 2010 · history and politics, podcasts, video

Alex Callinicos on Bonfire of Illusions

Continue Reading · 5 September 2010 · economics, history and politics, video

Latest Podularity videos

Click on the image below to see the latest Podularity videos on Vimeo:

Continue Reading · 5 May 2010 · historical fiction, history and politics, literature, video